Tuesday, October 17, 2017

5 Steps to Creating Student Documentaries in Middle School

This year my students read books about the impact of Hurricane Katrina using digital lit circles.  Upon completion of their books/lit circles, students worked together to make documentaries on how the storm impacted different groups of people that experienced this catastrophe.  

I recently had the opportunity to share this process and five tips that I found to be crucial for students to successfully create documentaries in middle school on one of my favorite educational websites, WeAreTeachers.  This website is a great resource for classroom ideas and strategies, and I was honored to have a blog post featured.  

Check out my post on 5 Steps to Creating Student Documentaries in Middle School.  You won't want to miss the FREEBIE that's included!!

Source- WeAreTeachers

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Using Flipgrid in the Classroom

I'm constantly on the lookout for new ways to incorporate technology and other digital resources.  You can read about some of my favorites here.  With the start of each school year, I find myself searching for digital tools that I haven't tried before.  This year, I feel like I hit the jack pot!  For those of you who are just hearing about the amazing Flipgrid for the first time, boy are you in for a treat!!!

Flipgrid is a video response platform where educators can have online video discussions with their students or other educators.  Teachers can provide feedback to their students once they have posted their video response, and students can also give feedback to one another.  There are endless opportunities to take advantage of Flipgrid in the classroom.

My students recently completed a hyperdoc where they reviewed the parts of speech.  The last activity in the hyperdoc was to reflect on and summarize what they had learned.  This is where Flipgrid came in! They shared their reflections using Flipgrid, and I was able to provide fast and easy feedback to each student.  You can provide written feedback, or you can click on a heart, light bulb, or any of the other emoji choices available if you're looking to do it quickly.  You can see a couple action shots from my students below.



So what are some other ways teachers can use Flipgrid in the classroom???  Here are 10 ideas to get you started:

  • Book Recommendations- Have your students share recommendations on books that they have read.  You can create a topic that's titled, "Book Recommendations."  When students are looking for books to read, they can head over to Flipgrid, and check out all of the books that have been recommended.
  • Formative Assessments- Have students discuss a particular skill that they have been learning in class.  This will show you how much they have (or haven't) learned.
  • Exit Tickets- Similar to a formative assessment, students can post a short video discussing the material they learned in class that day.
  • Student (AND Teacher) Introductions- At the start of a new year, students can use Flipgrid to introduce themselves to the teacher and the rest of the class.  The teacher can do the same.
  • Hyperdoc Activity- If you're using Hyperdocs (which is the greatest digital invention EVER), using Flipgrids would be a great addition to include!  As I shared above, it's the perfect way to wrap up all of the activities by having students reflect on all of the skills that have been covered.
  • Turning Point- Discuss the turning point or climax of a story or event.
  • Connect w/ other Flipgrid Users- Find other teachers who use Flipgrid and make plans to connect your classes.  You could possibly focus on the same topic or skill, and then ask questions, share responses, etc.  This could even be done with classes in other countries!
  • Watch & Respond- With Flipgrid, you can link a Youtube video or video you create.  Have students view the video and then post a response.
  • Stating Claim/Responding with Evidence- When I'm teaching my students the Argumentative Essay Writing process, they have to be able to clearly state their claim and prove it with supporting evidence.  Have them do this orally using Flipgrid. 
  • Oral Reading Responses- Rather than writing or typing answers to reading response questions, have them respond orally on Flipgrid.


There are 2 different options to choose from when creating an account:  Flipgrid One, the free version, and Flipgrid Classroom, which is the paid option that is $65/yr.  With the free version, you get 1 grid with unlimited topics and unlimited student videos.  Teachers can also provide individual student feedback.  With Classroom Flipgrid, in addition to all that comes w/ the free account, you also receive unlimited grids and unlimited student replies to responses.  Learn more about this here.  If you would like to learn more about how to get started, check out the videos Flipgrid posted on Twitter.

Have you used Flipgrid with your students?  If so, I'd love to hear all about it in the comments below!

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Bonus Sale on Lit with Lyns Resources

I wanted to let you know that for today only, you can get 25% off of all of my resources using the code BTSBONUS at checkout!

This is a great time to stock up and make your life a little easier as you head back to school. I have added several new activities that will help you out as you get started here.  Enjoy and I hope you all have a wonderful year!!!

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

ELA Live Series- August, 2017


Want to make this year your BEST YEAR EVER!?!  Let us help you make that happen!  We have 15 experienced ELA teachers who will be coming to you LIVE each night on Facebook, beginning August 1- August 15th!  We will share our tried and true tips and teaching strategies to help make this school year the most successful yet!  Check out our schedule below, and make plans to head over to each educator's Facebook page at the specified time.

Aug. 1st at 9 pm EST
"Project Based Learning for Secondary English Classrooms" with Mud & Ink Teaching


Aug. 2nd at 9 pm EST
"Strategies for Writing Commentary for Literary Analysis" with Bespoke ELA


Aug. 3rd at 9 pm EST
"Ideas and Strategies to Incorporate Choice Reading" with Doc Cop


Aug. 4th at 9 pm EST
"Pinpoint the Source of Most Reading Problems in Five Minutes" with Reading Simplified


Aug. 5th at 9 pm EST
"How to Teach Students to Elaborate on their Thinking" with English, Oh My! 


Aug. 6th at 9 pm EST
"How to Run a Book Club" with The Reading and Writing Haven

Aug. 7th at 9 pm EST
"Encourage Independent Reading in Reluctant Learners" with Samson's Shoppe


Aug. 8th at 9 pm EST
"Using Showcase Projects to Increase Engagement" with Spark Creativity

Aug. 9th at 4 pm EST
"How to Publish Student Writing Online and Create E-Portfolios" with Amanda Write Now


Aug. 10th at 9 pm EST
"5 Hidden Gems (books!) that Both Teachers and Students will Love with 2 Lifelong Teachers

Aug. 11th at 9 pm EST
"Starting on the Right Track with Struggling Secondary (Dependent) Learners" with Secondary Urban Legends


Aug. 12th at 9 pm EST
"Back to School Digital Escape Room" with Lit with Lyns


Aug. 13th at 9 pm EST
"Conferring with Student Writers" with Wild Child Designs


Aug. 14th at 9 pm EST
"Giving Meaningful Feedback to Writers" with Read it. Write it. Learn It. 


Aug. 15th at 9 pm EST
"Grammar Manipulations: Holding Language" with Language Arts Classroom.

I hope that these tips and strategies help you have a smooth start to the new school year!  What advice do you have to help other teachers get their school year off to a good start?  I'd love to hear about it in the comments below.

Monday, July 24, 2017

Back to School- Digital Escape Room

You all know it's coming....wait for it....BACK TO SCHOOL time is just around the corner!  All good things must come to an end, right??  That being said, I started thinking about important items that I wanted to cover with my students over the first couple weeks of school.  My classroom is almost 100% paperless, so I knew that I wanted to introduce my students to technology almost immediately. Keeping that in mind, I decided to create a Back to School Breakout- Digital Escape Room.  I became obsessed with using Digital Breakouts over the last year and shared this with you when I used an escape room for ELA Test Prep.

If your students have never completed a breakout before, you may want to explain what this is. Digital Breakouts are based on escape rooms and involve students trying to use clues to crack multiple codes in a certain amount of time.  I'm usually pretty flexible with the time, but they can typically take about 45-60 minutes in my experience.

The Back to School Breakout includes the following:

  • A student survey, which will allow you to get to know them better
  • Tips that help students to be successful throughout the school year
  • Explains the importance of setting SMART Goals
To begin, students will go to a Google Form, where they will complete the Beginning of the Year Student Survey.  Students will be asked a series of questions which will allow you to get to know their interests, likes, dislikes, how well they understand and can use technology, etc.  Then once they get to the last question, they will be required to click on a link, which will take them to a jigsaw puzzle.  Here, they must put the puzzle together correctly, and once they do, they will see the code. They will be directed to enter the code on the Google Form.  Once they enter it in correctly, they will be taken to the second escape "room." 


In the 2nd escape room, they will be given a link to a video on tips for having a successful school year.  At the end of the video, they will be given the next code that must be entered in order to move on to escape room 3.  

The final challenge is to watch a video on setting SMART Goals.  I love introducing this at the beginning of the year, because this is something I refer to often.  My students update their SMART goals every quarter and modify them as necessary.  At the end of the video, they are directed to go to the Google Form and follow the directions in order to proceed.  On the Google Form, they are told to click a link in order to figure out what the code is.  The link will take them to a fake plane ticket. On the plane ticket, they are directed to look for a *hint that will help them with the final code.  Once they figure the code out and enter correctly, a "CONGRATULATIONS" message is displayed.  


This is a great way to get your students thinking right off the bat, while also being able to learn more about them, as well.  The best part about using Google Forms to have students input information about themselves is that it automatically saves to your Google Drive in a spreadsheet!  Each question is displayed, along with the students' names and their answers.  That means that you can refer to the info gathered at anytime throughout the year.  

What are your back to school staples?  I'd love to hear about them in the comments!



Monday, June 26, 2017

Google Classroom- Showing Students How to Access & Use

A while back I blogged about how to add assignments in Google Classroom.  Today I posted a video that I plan to show my students at the beginning of the school year on how to access and submit assignments on Google Classroom.  I thought I would share with you, so that you'll have it to use if you would like, as well.

Saturday, April 29, 2017

Digital Escape Room- ELA Test Prep

Escape Rooms have been the latest buzz in education.  I kept hearing teachers talk about them on social media, and then I had students come to school talking about how much fun they had going to them over the weekend.  Since I try to keep my classroom paperless, I decided to combine the two and create a Digital Escape Room for ELA Test Prep!  Kids dread nothing more than end of year testing...so why not make reviewing for these dreaded assessments something the kids will remember??!?  And how perfect that they can remember skills we need them to know for the test!!!

I watched several tutorials on setting this up digitally (Breakout EDU has some great info by the way), and this is what I came up with.

There are a couple of ways you can have your students complete the Digital Escape Room:
  • You can put students into groups.  Share the link to the Google Form via Google Classroom, on your class website, in an email, etc. with only the group leaders.  Then the group leader can share it w/ the other members.  That way they can all work on it together as a group, but still use their own device.  I would suggest no more than 4 students per group. 
  • Assign to every student. 
To begin, you will share the link to the Digital Escape Room Google Form with your students.  This is what students will see when they click on the link:
Here they will enter their name(s), and then click "next."  Once they click next, they will be taken to the screen below:

Next, they will click the link provided and will be taken to the first escape room-- a figurative language drag-and-drop matching activity.  They are required to match the correct definition w/ the appropriate word.  They will need to enter the first letter of  the word in that phrase. For example, the first box listed is the term “figurative language.” They would need to find the definition to figurative language, which is “writing that is not to be taken literally.”  The first letter in this definition is a w.  Therefore, the first letter in the code would be a w (they already have the first answer as I give them this in the directions).  Since there are 8 total examples, the code will have 8 letters.  When they enter the code, all letters must be lower cased.  If they enter the code incorrectly, it will say "Still locked!!"  Then they have to go back and see what they missed until they break the code.  Once they get it correct, they can move on to the next room.  

The 2nd escape room reviews point of view. Students will click the following link on the form, and then complete the point of view activity.  It requires them to read the passage, and then determine what type of point of view is being used.  

 
 
In order to break out, they will need to enter the first number of the point of view listed.  For example, if #1 is 1st person point of view, then they would type a 1.  There are 12 different passages, so the code will have 12 numbers. Once they enter the code correctly, they will be taken to the next room.

The 3rd escape room reviews text structureStudents will click the link on the Google Form and will be taken to the activity.  Then they will read the passage, and determine what type of text structure is represented.  





The 4th and last escape room covers main idea. Students will click the link on the Google Form and will be taken to the activity.  Once there, they will be given a link to a Times 4 Kids article that they will read.  After reading the article, they will answer 5 multiple choice questions.  In order to break the code, they will need to enter each answer choice.  There are 5 questions, so they will have 5 total letters.  For example– if #1 is a, then this is the first letter in the code.



Once they enter the correct code, they will see the "Congratulations! image!
My students completed this right before our state testing, and they absolutely loved it!  It proved to be a great way to prepare and cover the areas that were important skills to review beforehand.  If you would like to have your students enjoy some pre-assessment fun, while also getting a terrific review in, check this out here!